Founded in 1988 by historian Ruth Abram and social activist Anita Jacobsen, the Tenement Museum explores the uniquely American story of immigration and the rich, diverse landscape it continues to create. According to official classification, 22,701 people lived in ‘third-class’ houses which were termed as unfit for human habitation. They were unaware of the dangers of the dangers of living in the slums. The tenements that lined Burlington Street were from two different eras. The buildings were small, crowded and run down. The living conditions in the tenements were horrible. Poorer families in Britain lived in small and crowded tenements. TENEMENTS. The report of the housing committee provides a vivid picture of tenement conditions. 2.3 million people lived in the tenements in New York by the 1990's, which was almost two thirds of the population at the time. If you know the answer to this question, please register to join our limited beta program and start the conversation right now! Often seven or more people lived in each apartment. Tenements were first built to house the waves of immigrants that arrived in the United States during the 1840s and 1850s, and they represented the primary form of urban working-class housing until the New Deal. Families with four to five children shared rooms. The tenement is much like the one in front we just left, only fouler, closer, darker – Sometimes I have doubted that anybody knows just how many children there are about. The stairs were steep and dangerous to climb. By 1900, more than 80,000 tenements had been built and housed 2.3 million people, two-thirds of the total city population. Tenements were first built to house the waves of immigrants that arrived in the United States during the 1840s and 1850s, and they represented the primary form of urban working-class housing until the New Deal.A typical tenement building was from five to six stories high, with four apartments on each floor. The industrial revolution improved the lives of few but, made the majority of the workforce live under strikingly difficult conditions. Both rooms were multitasking. By this time, the population increased for about 25% making living in tenements more harmful. Tenements were first built to house the waves of immigrants that arrived in the United States during the 1840s and 1850s, and they represented the primary form of urban working-class housing until the New Deal. How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York (1890) is an early publication of photojournalism by Jacob Riis, documenting squalid living conditions in New York City slums in the 1880s. That baby’s parents live in the rear tenement here. By 1900, more than 80,000 tenements had been built, but two-thirds of the city’s population, roughly 2.3 million people, lived in these tenements (Tenements). Early tenement life was tough, sharing one toilet with four different families, no electricity, hot running water or central heating, but a great sense of community and togetherness. By 1900, more than 80,000 tenements had been built and housed 2.3 million people, two-thirds of the total city population. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, New York City swelled with wave after wave of European immigrants — and many lived in tenement buildings. According to Adam Smith, individuals promote the good of society because of